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Listing all posts with the category "Grasmere"

Installation of the 1st temporary bridge on Dunmail Raise bypass

7 February 2016 / News / Weather / Grasmere

Many of you will be aware that the A591 route to Keswick has been closed since the December flooding after Storm Desmond.

The good news is that a temporary bridge has now been installed.

A591 'The Gap' bridge in place Photo Credit – Martin Campbell, Grasmere

Grasmere is Open for Business

The A591 in Cumbria is set to open for a public transport service between Grasmere and Keswick using a newly constructed temporary bypass & bridge over a river.

A PUBLIC bus service connecting Keswick and Grasmere via Thirlmere is planned to start later this month using the temporary road being built to bypass “The Gap” on Dunmail Raise.

The bus is expected to begin operating on February 16.

The bus service, which will be delivered on a commercial basis by Stagecoach, will connect with existing bus services at Grasmere, including through the central lakes to Kendal.

It will operate on an hourly basis from 7am until 7pm six days a week, with a two hourly service on a Sunday between 10am and 5pm, and offer a journey time of 45 minutes; cutting the existing journey time between the two locations by almost two hours.

Buses will leave Keswick at 5 minutes past the hour and leave Grasmere at 10 minutes to the hour (apart from the first bus of the day which will depart at 7am).

Watch video of the Installation of the 1st temporary bridge on Dunmail Raise bypass

Follow more stories on Grasmere Village Facebook page

Plus:

Another great reason to visit the Lake District 30% off rail fare via VirginTrains!

Why not get some inspiration from the new Cumbria Tourism 2016 Guide

#GrasmereIsOpen

#NotJustLakes


Rashomon - THIS WEEK'S FILM

9 June 2014 / Events / Grasmere / Arts / Culture / Film

Film Screening Thursday 12th June at 8.00pm

Join us for the first of four monthly film screenings celebrating Japanese cinema, in conjunction with The Wordsworth Trust, Grasmere.

Book your tickets here

Rashomon (1950), 88 minutes [Unrated]
Director: Akira Kurosawa
Language: Japanese

Shot in black and white, this multi-award-winning film tells the story of a heinous crime and its aftermath from five different perspectives. A brilliant exploration of truth and human weakness.

Rashomon Film Poster

Storyline
A priest, a woodcutter and another man are taking refuge from a rainstorm in the shell of a former gatehouse called Rashômon. The priest and the woodcutter are recounting the story of a murdered samurai whose body the woodcutter discovered three days earlier in a forest grove. Both were summoned to testify at the murder trial, the priest who ran into the samurai and his wife traveling through the forest just before the murder occurred. Three other people who testified at the trial are supposedly the only direct witnesses: a notorious bandit named Tajômaru, who allegedly murdered the samurai and raped his wife; the white veil cloaked wife of the samurai; and the samurai himself who testifies through the use of a medium. The three tell a similarly structured story – that Tajômaru kidnapped and bound the samurai so that he could rape the wife – but which ultimately contradict each other, the motivations and the actual killing being what differ.

100% Tomatoemeter – Review on Rotten Tomatoes ‘One of legendary director Akira Kurosawa’s most acclaimed films, Rashomon features an innovative narrative structure, brilliant acting, and a thoughtful exploration of reality versus perception.’

Peter Bradshaw – The Guardian , Thursday 17th June 2010
‘Akira Kurosawa’s 1950 masterwork is a chilling, utterly memorable dissection of the nature of human communication.’

Food served from 7.00pm. Screenings start at 8.00pm

Price: £9.50. including a BBQ supper – paid up Meetup – Grasmere Movie Night group members £8.00

Join our Grasmere movie nights here

More information here – RASHOMAN IMDB


A great morning for Photographs

31 August 2012 / Weather / Walks / Grasmere / Coast To Coast / Photography

Three great photos for you this morning, with morning mist and blue skies – looking forwards to a grand day in the Lakes.

View towards Helvellyn

Up towards Helvellyn, this is the Coast to Coast route to Patterdale. Views of Seat Sandal. Grisedale Hause (the Gap before Grisedale Tarn), Fairfield and Great Rigg.

Helm Crag from the How at Throney How

This is our view of Helm Crag from the top of the How at Thorney How, overlooking our roof line.

First Autumn Colours Grasmere

First autumn colours appearing in the garden.


Grasmere Rushbearing

10 July 2011 / Events / Grasmere

Next weekend the traditional Grasmere Rushbearing takes place on Saturday 16th July 2011

The ‘rushbearing’ is is a cross made of rushes or flowers and carried by local children.

See http://www.visitcumbria.com/rushbearing-festivals.htm for more information

A procession is led by a band, followed by the clergy, and then the children of the village, and ends at the Church with hymns and prayers. The procession leaves the School at 3.30pm, making its way around the village centre before arriving back at St Oswald’s Church. there follows a brief service and then tea at 5pm.
There is entertainment for children and a brass band concert in Church.

All are welcome to attend, there is no admission charge


Helm Crag – a walk on our doorstep

10 July 2011 / History / Walks / Grasmere

Sunset over Helm Crag

One of the very popular walks that you can do right form our doorstep is the small but prominent peak of Helm Crag, also fondly known as ‘The Lion and The Lamb’. Helm Crag is one of the peaks listed in Wainwright’s Central Fells guide book published in 1958. Wainwright states that Helm Crag’s height is 1,299ft but the more modern OS 1:25,000 map now puts it at 405m (1,328ft).

Route Map: Helm Crag - thanks to 'the Lakeland Fells'

Wainwright also states that Helm Crag ‘may well be the best known of all Lakeland fells’ and describes it as ‘an exhilarating little climb’, ‘if it has a fault it is that it is too short’.

We’re very proud of the fact that Thorney How is of course listed in Wainwrights guide and the hostel features on his drawn maps as a Youth Hostel. Thorney How (the rock feature) is part of the SE line of crags that trail down towards Grasmere as an extension to the ridge from Gibson Knott. Gibson Knott itself is also well worth the extra 1 mile extension to the walk.

I have been climbing Helm Crag since I can remember and I was very probably carried up it by my parents before that!

For more walk details see: http://www.leaney.org/lake_district_fells.php?fell_id=helm_crag